NCHM JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

NCHM JEE 2011 Previous Year Question Paper Mock Test Series
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Note : These are the question headers from the NCHM JEE 2011 Previous Year Question Paper for reference purposes only. The full question paper, along with answer keys and explanatory videos for important questions are included in the MagicExam NCHM JEE 2020 Mock Test Online Series.

1. Ashu spends 25 percent less than Nishu on Diwali fireworks. How much per cent more did Nishu spend than Ashu?

2. A force of 100 dynes acts on a mass of 5 gms for 10 second. Find the change in momentum.

3. What horse power engine is required to lift 1100 lbs of iron per second from a mine 20 ft. deep?

4. The square root of 0.9 is

5. Ten years ago, the ratio of ages of A and B was 3 : 5. The ratio of their present ages is 2 : 3. Their respective ages in years are:

6. If the price of sugar increased by 25 percent, by what percentage should a housewife decrease her consumption so that her expenditure on sugar remains the same?

7. The diameter of a wheel of a cycle is 70 cm. It moves slowly along a road. How far will it go in 24 complete revolutions?

8. Swarna invested Rs. 2,592 in buying shares of a company at Rs. 108 each. The face value of each share is Rs. 100. The company paid 12.5 percent dividend at the end of the year. Find the dividend received by Swarna at the end of the year.

9. The average of seven numbers is 24 while the average of nine numbers including these seven is 25. If the additional two numbers be in the ratio of 1 : 2, what is the smaller of these?

10, If Sin (A + B) = I and cos (A – B) – I, find A and B.

11. A wire of length 25 cm is bent so as to be along the arc of a circle of diameter 100 cm. The angle subtended by the arc at the centre of the circle is :

12. A population of a country is 90 crores. If it increases by then 2 percent in first year and 10 percent in second year, then what will be the population after second year?

13. Find the area of the sector of a circle of radius 14 cm and angle of sector is 45 degrees

14. A and B are two sets such that n(A) = 17, n(B) = 23 and n(A Union B) = 38. Then n(A Intersection B) is

15. Find the H.C.F. of (x2 – y2)2 and (x + y)4.

16. If 15 percent of X is the same as 20 percent of Y, then X : Y is

17. 4.036 divided by 0.04 gives

18. 25 = ? of 125, the number that can replace the question mark is

19. 11/4 = 77/?

20. IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

21. E.C.G. is a technique to record the activity of:

22. Normal blood pressure of man is:

23. The deficiency of iron in man results in:

24. The credit of “White Revolution” in India goes to:

25. Mud houses are cooler is summers and warmer in winters as compared to brick houses because:

26. Montreal Protocol is related with:

27. Bits stand for

28. Which of the following is correct?

29. Light from the sun reaches us in

30. A vast collection of stars held together by mutual gravitational force is called a

31. Refer to the word below (each letter can be used in more than one word. No letter can be repeated within a single word)

T R I C H O G E N O U S

If the 1st, 5th and 8th letters of the word were taken, and then reversed and again the 1st, 5th and 8th letters taken, how many four lettered words can be formed?

32. Refer to the word below (each letter can be used in more than one word. No letter can be repeated within a single word)

T R I C H O G E N O U S

The word formed by using all of the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th letters rhymes with

33. Refer to the word below (each letter can be used in more than one word. No letter can be repeated within a single word)

T R I C H O G E N O U S

The word formed by using all of the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th letters means

34. Refer to the word below (each letter can be used in more than one word. No letter can be repeated within a single word)

T R I C H O G E N O U S

Reversing the word above and taking the 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th letters and forming word using all of them, that word means

35. In the question, the numbers follow a particular logical order. Identify the number from among the given alternatives which should fill the blank space in the series.

16, 24, 34, 46, ____

36. In the question, the numbers follow a particular logical order. Identify the number from among the given alternatives which should fill the blank space in the series.

6, 12, 18, ____

37. In the question, the numbers follow a particular logical order. Identify the number from among the given alternatives which should fill the blank space in the series.

4, 12, 36, 108, ____

38. For the question below, determine the relationship between the pair of capitalized words and then select the lettered pair of words which have a similar relationship as the given pair.

MULTIPLICATION : DIVISION ::

39. For the question below, determine the relationship between the pair of capitalized words and then select the lettered pair of words which have a similar relationship as the given pair.

WATER : CONDUIT ::

40. For the question below, determine the relationship between the pair of capitalized words and then select the lettered pair of words which have a similar relationship as the given pair.

PLAINTIFF: DEFENDANT ::

41. If day before yesterday was Thursday then what day will be fourth after tomorrow?

42. If ‘sky’ is called ‘Tea’, ‘sea’ is called ‘water’, ‘water’ is called ‘air’, ‘air’ is called ‘cloud’ and ‘cloud’ is called ‘river’, then what do we drink when thirsty?

43. Introducing a man, a woman said, “His wife is the only daughter of my mother.” How is the woman related to that man?

44. Sohan walks 20 m North. Then, he turns right and walks 30 m. Then, he turns right and walks 35 m. Then, he turns left and walks 15 m. Then, he again turns left and walks 15 m. In which direction and how many metres away is he from his original position?

45. There are two statements followed by two inferences in the question. Select the correct option following the inferences.

Statements :
(A) Some teachers are followers.
(B) Some followers are famous.

Inferences :
(I) Some teachers are famous.
(II) Some followers are famous.

46. There are two statements followed by two inferences in the question. Select the correct option following the inferences.

Statements :
(A) All terrorists are humans.
(B) All humans are bad.

Inferences :
(I) All terrorists are bad.
(II) No human can be terrorist.

47. If HUMIDITY is coded as UHMIIDTY, how is POLITICS coded?

48. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

49. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

50. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

51. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

52. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

53. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

54. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

55. Each row consists of four figures called Question Figures and four options called the Answer Figures. The Question Figures make a series. You are to find which one of the Answer Figures would be the next one in the given series.

IHM SAMPLE PAPERS NCHMCT JEE 2011 Previous Question Paper Mock Test Series

56. Study the following letter-number sequence and answer the question below.

E 7 G B D M 4 N K H 2 A C Z S V 3 F 1 J L O Q 5 P R

If it is possible to make a meaningful word with the first, the twelfth, the fifteenth and the twenty – first letters, then which of the following will be the first letter of that word? If no such word can be made, give X as your answer and if more than one such word can be made, give M as your answer.

57. Study the following letter-number sequence and answer the question below.
What will come in place of question mark in the following sequence?

G D R B M P D 4 5 ?

58. Study the following letter-number sequence and answer the question below.
If the letters / numbers only from M to L are written in the reverse order and other letters / numbers are kept unaltered, which letter will be third to the right of 17th letter / number from the right?

59. Study the following letter-number sequence and answer the question below.
If every third letter / number starting from the right replaces successive days of the week starting from Monday, which letter will replace Thursday?

60. Study the following letter-number sequence and answer the question below.
If every alternate letter / number is dropped starting from E onwards, which letter / number will be second to the left of the tenth letter / number from the left?

61. The country with the highest population /density is:

62. What do you mean by ‘reserved forest’?

63. Atmosphere with excess of carbon dioxide as a result of pollution could result:

64. Atmospheric pressure depends on
1. Altitude
2. Temperature
3. Earth rotation
4. Moon’s pull

65. When the first metal tool came into being it was used for?

66. In the vedic age,

67. The founder of the Nanda Dynasty was:

68. How many times has Atal Bihari Vajpayee been sworn in as the Prime Minister of India?

69. Dronacharya Award is given:

70. Burma (Myanmar) was separated from India in:

71. Where is Dead Sea situated among continents?

72. Delhi became the capital of India in:

73. The brand AIWA is owned by:

74. Protocols is used to communicate between:

75. Where is the European Union headquartered?

76. Who is the author of the book ‘Is New York Burning’?

77. The prominent function of Central Statistical Organisation is :

78. Planning and control are related in such a way that :

79. World Tourism Day falls on:

80. ‘Ngultrum’ is the currency of:

81. Who among the following is not associated with sitar?

82. Match the following lists.

Religion
1. Judaism
2. Taoism
3. Zoroastrianism
4. Buddhism

Sacred Books
i. Sutras
ii. Torah
iii. Hadis
iv. Avesta
v. Tao-te-ching

Select the option which corresponds to order 1, 2, 3, 4

83. Who was the first Indian actress to receive the Padma Shri Award?

84. The first Chief Justice of India was

85. In order to win the Grand Slam in Tennis, a player must win which one of the following groups of tournaments?

86. “Abhinava Bharat”, a secret society of revolutionaries, was organized by:

87. Endoscopy, a technique used to explore the stomach or other inner parts of the body, is based on the phenomenon of:

88. Saina Nehwal is a famous player associated with the game of:

89. Summer Olympic of 2016 will be organized in a city in:

90. Which of the following represents female literacy rate in India? (As per provisional figures of Census 2011)

91. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc. remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : Why are employers reluctant to hire Indian labour force?

(1) India’s labour force is overqualified for the employment opportunities available.
(2) High attrition rate among employees stemming from their entrepreneurial spirit.
(3) Labour laws are not conducive to generating employment.

92. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc. remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : What is the state of India’s basic input sectors at present?

93. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc. remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : Which of the following can be said about the Indian economy at present?

94. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc. remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : What impact has the GDP growth of 7.8 per cent had?

(1) Indian Industry is anxious about India’s economic growth.
(2) India has achieved status as the world’s third largest economy at present.
(3) Foreign investment in India has drastically increased.

95. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc. remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : Which of the following is most opposite in meaning to the word MARKED given in bold as used in the passage?

96. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : What is the author’s main objective in writing the passage?

97. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : What measures do experts suggest be taken to ensure targeted economic growth?

98. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In a reversal of the norm elsewhere, in India policymakers and economists have become optimists while bosses do the worrying. The country’s Central Bank has predicted that the country’s economy is likely to grow at a double digit rate during the next 20-30 years. India has the capability with its vast labour and lauded entrepreneurial spirit. But the private sector which is supposed to do the heavy lifting that turns India from the world’s tenth largest economy to its third largest by 2030 has become fed up. Business people often carp about India’s problems but their irritation this time has a nervous edge. In the first quarter of 2011, GDP grew at an annual rate of 7.8 per cent; in 2005-07 it managed 9-10 per cent. The economy may be slowing naturally as the low interest rates and public spending that got India through the global crisis are belatedly withdrawn. At the same time the surge in inflation caused by exorbitant food prices has spread more widely, casting doubt over whether India can grow at 8-10 per cent in the medium term without overheating.

In India, as in many fast growing nations, the confidence to invest depends on the conviction that the long term trajectory is intact and it is that which is in doubt. Big Indian firms too sometimes seem happier to invest abroad than at home, in deals that are often hailed as symbols of the country’s growing clout but sometimes speak to its weaknesses-purchases of natural resources that India has in abundance but struggles to get out of the ground. In fact, a further dip in investment could be self-fulfilling: if fewer roads, ports and factories are built, this will hurt both short term growth figures and reduce the economy’s long-term capacity.

There is a view that because a fair amount of growth is assured the government need not try very hard. The liberalisation reforms that began in 1991 freed markets for products and gave rise to vibrant competition, at the same time what economists call factor markets, those for basic inputs like land, power, labour etc remain unreformed and largely under state control, which creates difficulties. Clearances today can take three to four years and many employers are keen to replace workers with machines despite an abundance of labour force. This can be attributed to labour laws which are inimical to employee creation and an education system that means finding quality manpower a major problem. In fact, the Planning Commission, concluded that even achieving 9 per cent growth will need marked policy action in unreformed sectors. Twenty years ago it was said that the yardstick against which India should be measured was its potential and it is clear that there remains much to do.

Question : Which of the following is most similar in meaning to the word CLOUT given in bold as used in the passage?

99. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : Which of the following is most similar in meaning to the word PROMOTES given in bold as used in the passage?

100. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : In the context of the passage which of the following characterise(s) democracies?

(1) Active participation of majority of educated citizens in electoral process.
(2) Fast paced economic growth and accountability of those in power.
(3) Better standards of living and access to higher education.

101. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : What according to the author has led to uprisings in authoritarian countries?

102. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : What does the phrase “messiness of democracy” convey in the context of the passage?

103. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : Which of the following is/are true about China in the context of the passage?

(1) China’s citizens are in favour of a more representative form of government.
(2) China has made huge strides in infrastructure developments.
(3) China is in the midst of a political revolution.

104. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : What conclusion can be drawn from the statistics cited about Egypt’s education system?

105. Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions.

In many countries, a combustible mixture of authoritarianism, unemployment and youth has given rise to disaffection with strongmen rulers which has in turn spilled over into uprising. Young people in these countries are far better educated than their parents were. In 1990, the average Egyptian had 4.4 years of schooling; by 2010 the figure had risen to 7.1 years. Could it be that education, by making people less willing to put up with restrictions on freedom and more willing to question authority, promotes democratization. Ideas about the links between education, income and democracy are at the heart of what social scientists have long studied. Since then plenty of economists and political scientists have looked for statistical evidence of a causal link between education and democratization. Many have pointed to the strong correlation that exists between levels of education and measures like the pluralism of party politics and the existence of civil liberties. The patterns are similar when income and democracy are considered. There are outliers, of course until recently, many Arab countries managed to combine energy-based wealth and decent education with undemocratic political systems. But some deduce from the overall picture -that as China and other authoritarian states get more educated and richer, their people will agitate for greater political freedom, culminating in a shift to a more democratic form of government.

This apparently reasonable intuition is shakier than it seems. Critics of the hypothesis point out that correlation is hardly causation. The general trend over the past half-century may have been towards rising living standards, a wider spread of basic education and more democracy, but it is entirely possible that this is being driven by another variable. Even if the correlation were not spurious, it would be difficult to know which way causation ran. Does more education lead to greater democracy? Or are more democratic countries better at educating their citizens? A recent NBER paper compared a group of Kenyan girls in 69 primary schools whose students were randomly selected to receive a scholarship with similar students in schools which received no such financial aid. Previous studies had shown that the scholarship programme led to higher test scores and increased the likelihood that girls enrolled in secondary school. Overall, it significantly increased the amount of education obtained. For the new study the authors tried to see how the extra schooling had affected the political and social attitudes of the women in question. Findings suggested that education may make people more interested in improving their own lives but they may not necessarily see democracy as the way to do it. Even in established democracies, more education does not always mean either more active political participation or greater faith in democracy. Poorer and less educated people often vote in larger numbers than their more educated compatriots, who often express disdain for the messiness of democracy yearning for the kind of government that would deal strongly with the corrupt and build highways, railway lines and bridges at a dizzying pace of authoritarian China.

Question : Which of the following most aptly describes the central theme of the passage?

106. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (1)

107. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (2)

108. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (3)

109. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (4)

110. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (5)

111. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (6)

112. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (7)

113. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (8)

114. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (9)

115. In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each, four words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Today experts all over the world are of the opinion that agriculture will affect the future of the world. The world has a serious food (1) and the only way to-solve (2) is if more people take up (3). Moreover since the 1980s, technology and finance jobs (4) been the basis of America’s economy. (5), in recent times, farmers’ incomes have risen (6). It has also been a long time (7) farming was a major source of employment, but data (8) that unemployment in America is (9) in states where farming is the (10) occupation. As the demand for food is rising what the world needs today is more farmers.

Find out the appropriate word which fits the blank numbered (10)

116. Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning to the word given below.

yields

117. Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning to the word given below.

tame

118. Choose the word which is most nearly the same in meaning to the word given below.

still

119. Choose the word(s) which is most opposite in meaning of the word given below.

reinforcing

120. Choose the word(s) which is most opposite in meaning of the word given below.

slump

121. In the question below a sentence with four words printed in bold type is given. These are numbered as (A), (B), (C) and (D). One of the words printed in bold may be either wrongly spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the word, which is wrongly spelt or inappropriate. Select the appropriate answer choice.

A. Another advantage/
B. is that technology/
C. can be quickly/adapted to the client’s needs
D. All are correct.

122. In the question below a sentence with four words printed in bold type is given. These are numbered as (A), (B), (C) and (D). One of the words printed in bold may be either wrongly spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the word, which is wrongly spelt or inappropriate. Select the appropriate answer choice.

A. It freed me to enter/
B. one of the most/
C. creatively/
D. periods of my life.

123. In the question below a sentence with four words printed in bold type is given. These are numbered as (A), (B), (C) and (D). One of the words printed in bold may be either wrongly spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the word, which is wrongly spelt or inappropriate. Select the appropriate answer choice.

A. About 4,500 private/
B. and 2000 government hospitals/
C. are empanelled/
D. under the scheme.

124. In the question below a sentence with four words printed in bold type is given. These are numbered as (A), (B), (C) and (D). One of the words printed in bold may be either wrongly spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the word, which is wrongly spelt or inappropriate. Select the appropriate answer choice.

A. More often/
B. then/
C. not we feel concerned/
D. with the development around us.

125. In the question below a sentence with four words printed in bold type is given. These are numbered as (A), (B), (C) and (D). One of the words printed in bold may be either wrongly spelt or inappropriate in the context of the sentence. Find out the word, which is wrongly spelt or inappropriate. Select the appropriate answer choice.

A. Software/
B. makers in India are facing/
C. a huge/
D. pressure.

126. In this question, two sentences (I) and (II) are given. Each sentence has a blank in it. Four words (A), (B), (C) and (D) are suggested. Out of these, only one fits at both the places in the context of each sentence. Select the appropriate answer choice.

I. The truck stopped _____
II. We take a _____ walk every day

127. In this question, two sentences (I) and (II) are given. Each sentence has a blank in it. Four words (A), (B), (C) and (D) are suggested. Out of these, only one fits at both the places in the context of each sentence. Select the appropriate answer choice.

I. I got the grains _____ in the machine.
II. I do not have any _____ for doubting him.

128. In this question, two sentences (I) and (II) are given. Each sentence has a blank in it. Four words (A), (B), (C) and (D) are suggested. Out of these, only one fits at both the places in the context of each sentence. Select the appropriate answer choice.

I. We were asked to design a _____ of the dam.
II. The Institute is a _____ of modern thinking.

129. In this question, two sentences (I) and (II) are given. Each sentence has a blank in it. Four words (A), (B), (C) and (D) are suggested. Out of these, only one fits at both the places in the context of each sentence. Select the appropriate answer choice.

I. Keep a grip _____ on the railing.
II. He was _____ asleep.

130. In this question, two sentences (I) and (II) are given. Each sentence has a blank in it. Four words (A), (B), (C) and (D) are suggested. Out of these, only one fits at both the places in the context of each sentence. Select the appropriate answer choice.

I. He asked me to _____ over the fence.
II. We should keep the valuables in the _____.

131. Which of the phrases given below should replace the phrase given in bold in the following sentence to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct.

Most of time, strangers have helped me in critical situations,

132. Which of the phrases given below should replace the phrase given in bold in the following sentence to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct.

The reality is that India needs a strong, efficient and competitive aviation sector^

133. Which of the phrases given below should replace the phrase given in bold in the following sentence to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct.

I have known this industry since the last two decades.

134. Which of the phrases given below should replace the phrase given in bold in the following sentence to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct.

Today’s children have far most knowledge and far less patience compared to our generation.

135. Which of the phrases given below should replace the phrase given in bold in the following sentence to make the sentence grammatically meaningful and correct.

Of late, Bonsai trees have attracted the attention of one and all.

136. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

137. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

138. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

139. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

140. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

141. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

142. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

143. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

144. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

145. Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical mistake/error in it. The error if any, will be in one part of the sentence. Mark the number of the part with error as your answer.

146. Which of the phrases given below in the answer choices should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct?

Although scared of heights, she gather all her courage and stood atop the 24-storey building to participate in the activities.

147. Which of the phrases given below in the answer choices should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct?

Naturally, with everything gone so well for them, it was time for celebration.

148. Which of the phrases given below in the answer choices should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct?

The ban was imposed by the state’s commercial taxes department last Friday after protests by a certain community, which had threat to burn cinema halls screening the controversial movie.

149. Which of the phrases given below in the answer choices should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct?

Rakesh, an avid football player who captained his team in school and college, will inaugurate the match tomorrow in Pune.

150. Which of the phrases given below in the answer choices should replace the phrase printed in bold in the sentence to make it grammatically correct?

At a musical night organised for them, the artistic side of the doctors came as forward, as they, sang beautifully and made the evening truly memorable.

151. Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph, then answer the question given below them.
(A) In all varieties of humour, especially the subtle ones it is therefore what the reader thinks which gives extra meaning to these verses.
(B) But such a verse may also be enjoyed at the surface level.
(C) Nonsense verse is one of the most sophisticated forms of literature.
(D) This fulfils the author’s main intention in such a verse which is to give pleasure.
(E) However, the reader who understands the broad implications of the content and allusion finds greater pleasure.
(F) The reason being it requires the reader to supply a meaning beyond the surface meaning.

Which of the following is the FIFTH sentence?

152. Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph, then answer the question given below them.
(A) In all varieties of humour, especially the subtle ones it is therefore what the reader thinks which gives extra meaning to these verses.
(B) But such a verse may also be enjoyed at the surface level.
(C) Nonsense verse is one of the most sophisticated forms of literature.
(D) This fulfils the author’s main intention in such a verse which is to give pleasure.
(E) However, the reader who understands the broad implications of the content and allusion finds greater pleasure.
(F) The reason being it requires the reader to supply a meaning beyond the surface meaning.

Which of the following is the SIXTH (LAST) sentence?

153. Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph, then answer the question given below them.
(A) In all varieties of humour, especially the subtle ones it is therefore what the reader thinks which gives extra meaning to these verses.
(B) But such a verse may also be enjoyed at the surface level.
(C) Nonsense verse is one of the most sophisticated forms of literature.
(D) This fulfils the author’s main intention in such a verse which is to give pleasure.
(E) However, the reader who understands the broad implications of the content and allusion finds greater pleasure.
(F) The reason being it requires the reader to supply a meaning beyond the surface meaning.

Which of the following is the FIRST sentence?

154. Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph, then answer the question given below them.
(A) In all varieties of humour, especially the subtle ones it is therefore what the reader thinks which gives extra meaning to these verses.
(B) But such a verse may also be enjoyed at the surface level.
(C) Nonsense verse is one of the most sophisticated forms of literature.
(D) This fulfils the author’s main intention in such a verse which is to give pleasure.
(E) However, the reader who understands the broad implications of the content and allusion finds greater pleasure.
(F) The reason being it requires the reader to supply a meaning beyond the surface meaning.

Which of the following is the SECOND sentence?

155. Rearrange the following six sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph, then answer the question given below them.
(A) In all varieties of humour, especially the subtle ones it is therefore what the reader thinks which gives extra meaning to these verses.
(B) But such a verse may also be enjoyed at the surface level.
(C) Nonsense verse is one of the most sophisticated forms of literature.
(D) This fulfils the author’s main intention in such a verse which is to give pleasure.
(E) However, the reader who understands the broad implications of the content and allusion finds greater pleasure.
(F) The reason being it requires the reader to supply a meaning beyond the surface meaning.

Which of the following is the THIRD sentence?

156. In each of these questions four words are given denoted by (A), (B), (C) and (D). Two of these words may be either synonyms or antonyms. Find out the correct pair in the question.

(A) ECSTASY
(B) DEPRESSION
(C) INTOXICATION
(D) COMPRESSION

157. In each of these questions four words are given denoted by (A), (B), (C) and (D). Two of these words may be either synonyms or antonyms. Find out the correct pair in the question.

(A) TRANQUILITY
(B) LOYALTY
(C) CALAMITY
(D) UPROAR

158. In each of these questions four words are given denoted by (A), (B), (C) and (D). Two of these words may be either synonyms or antonyms. Find out the correct pair in the question.

(A) VILIFICATION
(B) NULLIFICATION
(C) DENIGRATION
(D) FALSIFICTION

159. In each of these questions four words are given denoted by (A), (B), (C) and (D). Two of these words may be either synonyms or antonyms. Find out the correct pair in the question.

(A) OPAQUE
(B) TRANSLUCENT
(C) TRANSVERSE
(D) TRANSVESTITE

160. In each of these questions four words are given denoted by (A), (B), (C) and (D). Two of these words may be either synonyms or antonyms. Find out the correct pair in the question.

(A) EXORBITANT
(B) EXPEDITIOUS
(C) QUICK
(D) QUEST

161. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have been jumbled up. You are required to rearrange these parts which are labelled P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. Choose the proper sequence and mark in your Answers Sheet accordingly.

Explanation
The, proper way of writing the sentence is “Some people believe that the effect of cinema on children is very bad”. This is indicated by the sequence P -S – R – Q and so (A) is the correct answer.

At the door
P : that he would have the door broken open
Q : the guard shouted
R : if the persons inside did not heed his call
S : at the top of his voice

The correct sequence should be:

162. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have been jumbled up. You are required to rearrange these parts which are labelled P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. Choose the proper sequence and mark in your Answers Sheet accordingly.

Explanation
The, proper way of writing the sentence is “Some people believe that the effect of cinema on children is very bad”. This is indicated by the sequence P -S – R – Q and so (A) is the correct answer.

P : by bandits
Q : were driving through a desert area
R : a man and his daughter
S : when they were held up

The correct sequence should be:

163. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have been jumbled up. You are required to rearrange these parts which are labelled P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. Choose the proper sequence and mark in your Answers Sheet accordingly.

Explanation
The, proper way of writing the sentence is “Some people believe that the effect of cinema on children is very bad”. This is indicated by the sequence P -S – R – Q and so (A) is the correct answer.

Our finest contemporary achievement
P : and toil
Q : in the provision of higher education
R : is our unprecedented expenditure of wealth
S : for all

The correct sequence should be:

164. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have been jumbled up. You are required to rearrange these parts which are labelled P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. Choose the proper sequence and mark in your Answers Sheet accordingly.

Explanation
The, proper way of writing the sentence is “Some people believe that the effect of cinema on children is very bad”. This is indicated by the sequence P -S – R – Q and so (A) is the correct answer.

It seemed to him
P : like seeing one’s reflection
Q : an endless quest
R : two mirrors
S : while standing between

The correct sequence should be:

165. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have been jumbled up. You are required to rearrange these parts which are labelled P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. Choose the proper sequence and mark in your Answers Sheet accordingly.

Explanation
The, proper way of writing the sentence is “Some people believe that the effect of cinema on children is very bad”. This is indicated by the sequence P -S – R – Q and so (A) is the correct answer.

A series of shocks
P : is known as earthquake
Q : which can be recognised through seismic waves
R : that result from sudden earth movements or tremors
S : causing widespread destruction of life and property

The correct sequence should be:

166. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have been jumbled up. You are required to rearrange these parts which are labelled P, Q, R and S to produce the correct sentence. Choose the proper sequence and mark in your Answers Sheet accordingly.

Explanation
The, proper way of writing the sentence is “Some people believe that the effect of cinema on children is very bad”. This is indicated by the sequence P -S – R – Q and so (A) is the correct answer.

P : in this world
Q : a man has
R : it is possible that the best friend
S : may turn against him

The correct sequence should be:

167. The question consists of six sentences. The first sentence (S1) and the sixth sentence (S6) are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q, R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences and mark accordingly on the Answer Sheet.

S1 : A city tour organised by the airport got our next vote.
S6 : “We can only grow in heights, most of our land is reclaimed from the mud brought from neighbouring countries,” said Bernadette.
P : A bumboat ride through the Singapore River gave us a vantage view of the country’s prized possession of skyscrapers in the central business district.
Q : The tour is very popular with transit passengers and there are many such buses doing the route.
R : We were greeted into an air-conditioned Volvo bus with a bottle of chilled water.
S : On the drive through the ‘colonial heart’ of the city, our guide, Bernadette, pointed out the Parliament House, Supreme Court and City Hall to us.

The proper sequence should be:

168. The question consists of six sentences. The first sentence (S1) and the sixth sentence (S6) are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q, R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences and mark accordingly on the Answer Sheet.

S1 : But Bhutan is a curious mix of modern and the medieval.
S6 : His licence plate reads simply ‘BHUTAN’.
P : It was next to a speed limit sign : 8 km an hour.
Q : Even the king zips through in a navy blue Toyota Land Cruiser.
R : I noticed a rusty sign for the Kit Kat chocolate bar and realised it was the only advertisement I had seen.
S : Yet in the cities, most middle class people drive brand new Japanese cars.

The proper sequence should be:

169. The question consists of six sentences. The first sentence (S1) and the sixth sentence (S6) are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q, R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences and mark accordingly on the Answer Sheet.

S1 : His usually fretful features composed, Javagal Srinath announced his retirement from international cricket.
S6 : He finished with 236 wickets in 67 Tests and 315 in 229 One-day Internationals.
P : He had spent the early years of his 13-year career sitting out nine Tests when he was at his quickest, being reminded of everything he was not.
Q : In a classic case of appreciating a good thing when it is gone, the tributes poured” in for India’s most successful pace bowler after Kapil Dev.
R : Not aggressive enough, not a non-vegetarian, not an all-rounder.
S : Srinath soldiered on, whether wickets were flat or causes lost, as they, often were when India toured.

The proper sequence should be:

170. The question consists of six sentences. The first sentence (S1) and the sixth sentence (S6) are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q, R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences and mark accordingly on the Answer Sheet.

S1: However, the flower industry also has its share of thorns.
S6 : Also, there are no tax concessions from the Government.
P : Most companies have to individually invest in the transport, which is very costly.
Q : Then there are infrastructural bottlenecks—no refrigerated transport or retail chains and warehouses to store the highly perishable commodity.
R : For one, it is extremely fragmented and dominated by small players who don’t have the financial muscle to expand the business.
S : Ferns and Petals claims to be the only flower retailer with a multi-city presence in India.

The proper sequence should be:

171. Your colleague is not performing his duties up to the mark. You will:

172. If on a tough day you are the only person available to handle the customers, you should:

173. A product launched by the company is having initial hiccups and complaints. You will:

174. The front office in the organisation has a very uncomfortable physical set-up to work in. You will:

175. Your boss has very piercing eyes and spies on your performance all the time. You will:

176. You have opted for a course but a few weeks into it, the authorities tell you that the course has been cancelled and you need to shift to another one. You:

177. You are suffering from a high fever and you have a test the next day. You:

178. It’s your birthday and you want to spend the day with your friends, but your parents want you to spend the day at home. You :

179. You have an important exam in Mumbai. Two days before your flight, the airline calls and informs you of the cancellation of your flight. Instead, they offer you AC train tickets to your destination. You :

180. You plan to watch a long-awaited movie with friends. Your friends decide to watch a play instead and ask you to come along. You:

181. You are in a contest, which has elimination rounds. Eliminated contestants are sad and others too are becoming panicky. What do you do?

182. Your teacher asks you a question. You:

183. You are at the bus-stop and you see a woman wearing tight revealing clothes being eve-teased. You

184. You are a social worker. On visiting an orphanage there is one child who is not ready to let you go away.

185. A wife feels neglected because of her husband’s demanding job. The husband is too busy to spend enough time with her. What, according to you, should she do?

186. While motivating your workforce you would consider:

187. That job is most liked by you where you can:

188. Office Manager in a hotel is the head of:

189. If you have some problem with your employee, you would

190. In case of groupism in the organization, you would

191. Your immediate neighbour is quarrelsome by nature and is always fighting, even on trivial issues. You :

192. Late in the night you happen to hear strange sounds from the house of your immediate neighbour. You will :

193. What qualities you would look for in your life partner?

194. You need to book a hotel for conducting a big business meeting. You would prefer a hotel which is :

195. People who aspire to work in hotel industry should have the following personality trait(s):

196. If you find yourself in a situation where you are required to make a PowerPoint presentation and you are already bogged down by two much work, as the manager what would you do?

197. What is your attitude like when a subordinate approaches you to discuss a work-related problem?

198. The board appoints a hard-hearted CEO on your company who is extremely uncaring, makes fun of people and criticizes work for no reason. People feel scared and betrayed. No one is working and is barely able to function, as a senior HR what would you do?

199. You are the leader of a group and a new member joins it. How would you make the member comfortable?

200. What would you normally do in a crisis situation, for instance in a situation where two of your colleagues are involved in a conflict turned bitter and one of them has resigned. This is a huge loss as he is quite a competent personnel. You would

Note : These are the question headers from the NCHM JEE 2011 Previous Year Question Paper for reference purposes only. The full question paper, along with answer keys and explanatory videos for important questions are included in the MagicExam NCHM JEE 2020 Mock Test Online Series.

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